IMG_0202.jpg

A.M. Tsaasan

Tsaasan is a doctoral candidate studying community inclusion and exclusion by examining tools, practices and populations over time. Tsaasan seeks to understand factors related to successful inclusion practices in order to help organizations recruit previously excluded groups. Current projects include field work in Southern California esports communities and Play in the Anthropocene an esports community interactive arts exhibition.

tsaasan@uci.edu

IMG_0147.jpg

Craig G Anderson

Craig G Anderson is a doctoral student studying the cognitive influences of video game playing. A lifelong gamer and learner, his interests include how games engage players and how these principles can be leveraged for prosocial or educational means. Current projects include investigating the role of failure in educational games and persistence in esports.

craigga@uci.edu

IMG_0130.jpg

Jason Reitman

Jason is pursuing his PhD exploring cognition in teams of humans and machines. Through his current work observing elite esports teams, he aims to understand how these systems distribute cognitive work to ensure the team’s success.

jreitman@uci.edu

IMG_0180.jpg

Je Seok Lee

Jeseok Lee is a Ph.D. student studying social behavior of esports game players. He investigates players' in-game behavior pattern and seeks for a connection to other aspects of their life. Currently, he is applying machine learning methods to analyze complicated patterns of collaborative behavior when people play cooperative games.

jesl@uci.edu

IMG_0150.jpg

Minnie Wu

Minnie Wu is a doctoral student interested in what happens to players—cognitively, motivationally and socially— during gameplay, and how design elements make games fun and conducive to learning. Current projects investigate student learning of academic and social-emotional content in games and game communities.

minniew@uci.edu

53507462698__0DF0ADA7-9A6E-43B5-94E7-7BFADA52AE42.jpeg

Nicholas (Franc) Persa

Persa is a doctoral student working with 21st century digital communities to understand their decentralized knowledge practices. These digital communities constantly evolve, are on the cutting edge of web affordances, and provide novel experiences that have the potential to redefine the dominant modes of education and expertise development. A core practice in these communities involves professional players engaging in critical analysis with massive audiences. Professional knowledge development—a previously limited and private experience—is just one of the many interactions that 21st century digital communities are redefining.

nicholaspersa@gmail.com

Maria J. Anderson Coto

Maria J. Anderson-Coto is a PhD student exploring team dynamics and performance. Through her current work, she aims to understand how elite esports teams’ and professional players’ performances are influenced by internal and external factors. She is also interested in gender and inclusion around video games.

mj.anderson@uci.edu